≡ Menu

The Best of Money Carnival is now up at Debt Free Adventure.  Check out some great posts from the past week, particularily #1 Can You Go To Jail If You Don’t Pay A Debt? at Bible Money Matters.


While you poking around the internet, also check out the reads in the Festival of Frugality at Girls Just Want to Have Funds, where I’m proud to be featured with In OR Out Burger.


Article publié pour la première fois le 29/06/2010

0 comments

Growing up in New York, I was fortunate to have access to Broadway shows. Not only was Manhattan less than a half hour from my house, but my parents placed tremendous value on my sisters and I having the theater experience. As a member of my school’s chorus, we would take field trips to Broadway shows (which was, admittedly, pretty cool).  I grew up with the importance of theater drilled into my head.

It’s not something I’ve lost, either. As an adult, I still love going to Broadway shows. The problem, besides living 2 hours away from Manhattan, is that ticket prices are phenomenally high, even for long running shows. Forget the prices for a high profile show with big name talent…those are off the charts expensive (not to mention almost impossible to get tickets to). So what’s a theater lovin’ gal to do?

Fortunately, there are ways to have the Broadway experience for less:

  • review Traveling companies. Almost every major Broadway musical will have a traveling company version. In other words, a cast is formed and that cast travels to different cities for a week or so to perform the shows. Since it’s not on Broadway, and the cast is usually lesser known actors, the tickets are substantially cheaper. But, you still get to see the show closer to home, which also saves on your travel budget.
  • citas a ciegas web Go local. If a traveling company is still too expensive, why not go see a show at a local community theater, college or high school? The production value won’t be as high but you’ll still get the same experience, support your local schools and give back to your local economy. Plus, tickets are usually super cheap. One of the best theater experiences I ever had was at a community theater in Idaho so there’s definitely something to be said for local theater.
  • cherche homme libre The Theater Development Fund. This is a program designed for teachers, students, nonprofit employees, civil servants, members of the armed forces and clergy, and a few other professions to receive tickets at a deeply discounted price. There are some program restrictions: only select shows and dates are typically available, the dates are only available about 2 weeks in advance, and you must provide proof of your eligibility. If you’re willing to abide by those rules, this is a terrific program, especially if you live in the NYC area. Tickets are available to very popular shows and, if you’re a member, you can order up to 9 tickets at a time. For complete info, go to their website, TDF.org.
  • rencontre ligne 9 Discount tickets. Outlets like StubHub are great for buying last minute tickets but the prices could be jacked up (unless the ticket holder really wants to unload them) or for buying the tickets for cheap in advance. However, if you’re like me and don’t trust those outlets, there are TKTS booths (run and operated by TDF) that sell cheap last minute tickets to Broadway shows. Take note though. Each of the booths sells tickets for different performances so make sure you’re getting your tickets through the right one.
  • speed dating chino latino leeds Other ways to save: Volunteer at a theater. Check to see if any organizations you belong to offer discounts. Buy group tickets. See an off-Broadway show. Get on an email list like the one from Playbill.com. Attend a matinee (this is more effective for shows not on Broadway).

singlebУЖrse fУМr frauen Is going to plays and musicals important to you? How do you fit it into your budget or save money  on the tickets?

Article publié pour la première fois le 27/02/2012

2 comments

I just wrapped up a week-long invasion of my good friend E's house.  

First off, I'd like to say thank you to E for allowing me to stay at her pad instead of a hotel, thereby saving a little extra to put in the good ol' Roth IRA's.  

The truest friends care about your retirement funds.  You can quote me on that.  You could quote me on any of this, technically speaking.  

Let me tell you a bit about E.  She is a well-spoken, well-written, black-belt.  Maybe not a black-belt, but I'm pretty sure I couldn't take her.  

E put herself through college at the University of Georgia using a combination of work, parents, scholarships and student loans.  Her degree was in theater.  

Now an Air-Force-induced transient soul like me, E, up until recently, had been working in a church office. The job required good time management, work with technology, toleration of coworkers, you know, the usual job-type stuff (but no theater-type stuff).  

Yup, college is expensive.  

Yup, expensive endeavors are not to be taken lightly, especially by the non-loaded.

But E and I got to talking: there are many college degrees that some people would consider worthless.  We submit that a great deal of the value derived from a college degree has nothing to do with the concentration/focus/major.

[click to continue…]

Article publié pour la première fois le 19/10/2010

7 comments

5 Things You Can Buy Refurbished

People are always looking for new ways to save money and considering purchasing factory refurbished products is a great way to do this.  Refurbs may not be the best option for you either because of your comfort level or your desire to buy new, however, they are worth a look.  Before you start your search, here are some questions from the Practical Home Theater Guide that you’ll want to ask before buying a refurbished product:

  • Is it a factory-refurbished product?

  • Is the refurbished unit being sold by a manufacturer navigate to this web-site authorized dealer?

  • Does the refurbished unit have a sites de rencontre nouvelle caledonie valid U.S. warranty?

    At least it should come with a typical 45 to 90-day Parts and Labor warranty.

  • Does the retailer offer paris gay rencontre a return policy for the refurbished unit in case you are not completely satisfied with your purchase?

    Expect at least 15-days return policy. This is important so that you can inspect the product yourself before a final decision.

  • Is it possible to get site rencontre 47 an extended warranty for the refurbished item?

    This does not imply that you should purchase an extended warranty – rather it shows to what extent the retailer is ready to backup the refurbished product.

[click to continue…]

Article publié pour la première fois le 11/08/2010

1 comment

Independence Day

Sunday marks the 234th anniversary of the creation of the greatest nation the world has ever known.  Enjoy these thoughts on money from some of our Founding Fathers as well as the text of the Declaration whose signing we commemorate this weekend; I won’t pervert them with any of my own interpretations. 

Pres1

   

 

Bad seed is a robbery of the worst kind: for your pocket-book not only suffers by it, but your preparations are lost and a season passes away unimproved.

George Washington

 

 

 

 

[click to continue…]

Article publié pour la première fois le 02/07/2010

0 comments

The Creed

G&G133Today is a big day and you didn't even know it.  

It's my grandparent's 60th wedding anniversary.  And it's the eve of Going-to-Japan-Day for Hubs and I.   

So, I think it's only fitting to pass on some wisdom directly from Opa and Oma today.

While Opa was deployed to Pakistan for a year with the Air Force, Oma sent him the following verse which sat on his desk during his time there and now hangs on the wall in their office. 

Read the creed and you'll understand where I come from when you read any of my opinions. 

 

 

My Creed

By Dean Alfange

I do not choose to be a common man. It is my right to be uncommon—if I can.

I seek opportunity—not security.

I do not wish to be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me.

I want to take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed.

I refuse to barter incentive for a dole.

I prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of utopia.

I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my dignity for a handout.

I will never cower before any master nor bend to any threat.

It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think and act for myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations, and to face the world boldly and say, this I have done.

All this is what it means to be an American.

Article publié pour la première fois le 30/11/2010

4 comments